sarahhuang

Sarah Huang Huang von Vranov, 259 01 Votice, Tschechische Republik von Vranov, 259 01 Votice, Tschechische Republik

Leser Sarah Huang Huang von Vranov, 259 01 Votice, Tschechische Republik

Sarah Huang Huang von Vranov, 259 01 Votice, Tschechische Republik

sarahhuang

Feste Informationen, offen gesagt - aber die Anführungszeichen begannen mich auf ungefähr 1/4 des Weges durch das Buch wahnsinnig zu machen. Es waren alles gute Zitate und von sachkundigen Leuten, aber sie hatten oft wenig mit dem diskutierten Thema zu tun. Dennoch ist es eine Lektüre wert, wenn Sie noch nie einen Fernsehschreibkurs besucht haben und mehr darüber erfahren möchten. Umfasst Bereiche, die in den meisten Büchern dieses Genres nicht vorkommen, z. B. das Schreiben von Filmen der Woche sowie lokale Nachrichten- und Magazinsendungen. (Bei 30 US-Dollar ist der Preis allerdings etwas steil.)

sarahhuang

'm so glad I finished this book. SOOOOO glad I finally finished this book. But I was trying to figure out why I disliked it so much. It had all the ingredients of a Book I'd Like: International (Egypt and Italy), Family Saga, some ties to real-world events. Stylistically, the writing is what I enjoy. So why didn't I like it? Maybe it was because of a certain opaqueness. I often had a hard time keeping track of exactly what was going on. Maybe it was switching back and forth between three families early on (for no apparant reason). Or maybe it was that the last third (although it felt like less) goes back and forth between third-person narration and the first-person perspective of the daughter/granddaughter (who's clearly been the mostly-omniscient narrator throughout, but seriously, why switch?). I kept hoping that the end of the book would make it worth it (and that it would come soon) ...nope. This book was the most painful to finish I've read in a while. "Look," she repeated, unable to say anything else, and she realized this leap of faith was known to every pigeon, from its first flight out of the nest -- a nest inside one of the bell towers or under the moldings of one of the palaces -- from that first flight through the air to the man-made rocks and the grand statues; each had discovered it, that descent of the slide, with its first thirst, and had scooped up the water in its small beak, then raised its head to let the water run down its innocent, iridescent throat... (Her ellipses.)