carpediem93

Natasha Batagianni Batagianni von Kadei, Odisha 754022, Indien von Kadei, Odisha 754022, Indien

Leser Natasha Batagianni Batagianni von Kadei, Odisha 754022, Indien

Natasha Batagianni Batagianni von Kadei, Odisha 754022, Indien

carpediem93

Ich werde den Rest der Serie nicht lesen.

carpediem93

Leider bezweifle ich, dass sie dieses Buch übersetzt haben, aber wenn Sie es auf Spanisch lesen und in die Hände bekommen können, kann ich es sehr empfehlen. Sie unterteilen die Kurzgeschichten nach Ländern. Wenn Sie etwas über die Geschichte Zentralamerikas wissen, werden Sie es sicherlich umso mehr genießen, als Symbolik und Verweise auf vergangene Ereignisse weit verbreitet sind.

carpediem93

Of the Drizzt “origins” trilogy this one moved me the most, and contained the most surprises. You can tell Salvatore in this book is relieved to get out of the underdark. He fills the book with lush descriptions of the woods, streams, the loneliness and beauty of the wild places. He also describes the pioneer spirit of a community on the outskirts of civilization. He brings Drizzt agonizingly close to becoming accepted by a real family, only to in complete shocker and his best plot surprise to date, have them murdered in cold blood. Reading the book felt like I was watching a western where the natives wipe out a border family. Several characters in the book leap from the pages as being if not original, then freshly described. Roddy McGristle is every redneck bully I have ever met. He lives in my town and can be seen at a local bar on Friday and Saturday nights or walking his hunting dogs down the street and daring people not to get out of his way. He schemes for his financial gain all in the name of protecting and serving his community. He uses Drizzt’s people, not his person, as an excuse to hunt him down (for a handsome reward). In the end he gets his comeuppance but not before he causes damage. He makes things hard for an outsider because that is the only way he can ever be accepted. Another description is the mountain man Montolio who befriends Drizzt and with whom Drizzt serves the apprenticeship as a Ranger. In a twist Montolio is blind as a bad from a battle, and old, around seventy. To make him believable with his disablity was feat I didn’t think Salvatore could pull of but to my surprise he did. This was his sixth published Drizzt book and you can see him developing as writer. The best way to describe the characters movement from isolation to acceptance, and the way salvatore describes it, is to show him getting close to building a relationship with people only to lose it time and again. Sometimes through fate, other times through the sheer maliciousness of others. When the family that Drizzt observes is wiped out you can feel your heart dropped because you sensed an opportunity for acceptance. You are also kind of surprised at the way Salvatore doesn’t pull punches and kills of characters he was at pains to describe. That has to be hard for a novelist. Invest so much time and energy into a character and then have to wipe them out in the service of a plot. Ouch. And there are the comic scenes too. The pranks the young boy plays on Drizzt, the tricks montolio plays. The farm family’s games with each other. By this book he has learned how to alternate such scenes for comic effect. I also was moved by the way Drizzt serves his apprenticeship and learns to become useful. And then he becomes useful to the townspeople of the Ten Towns as a Ranger guardian. In so many ways Drizzt grows. He gains trust and friendship andlearns to give back in return without too much expectation. He’s not a fool, but he knows how to give help. Im not that certain that he knows how to receive help. Other characters and situations from the books that stand out: the sprite who is every thirteen year old know it all Ive ever had to work with. Cattie Brie who is so tender and just a girl in this book trying to understand the world around her. It moves me the way she takes to Drizzt. And Bruenor’s acceptance of him. That was a surprise.